Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

User avatar
Thanatos
Edição Única
Posts: 13870
Joined: 31 Dec 2004 22:36
Contact:

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Thanatos » 22 Mar 2010 11:47

Rouben Mamoulian, (Tíflis, Geórgia, 8 de outubro de 1897 — Hollywood, 4 de dezembro de 1987) foi um diretor de cinema armeno-americano.

Biografia
Filho de um banqueiro e de uma atriz armênia, ele foi para os Estados Unidos da América no final dos anos 20 para dirigir óperas e operetas, mas com o crescimento da indústria cinematográfica ele decidiu tentar a sorte em Hollywood.

Em 1929 ele dirigiu uma das primeiras produções faladas do cinema mundial: "Applause" (Aplausos)", e em seguida fez "City Streets" (Ruas da Cidade), estrelado por Gary Cooper e Sylvia Sidney.

Image

Em 1932 realiza seu filme de maior sucesso, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (O Médico e o Monstro), considerado pelos críticos de cinema como uma das melhores adaptações cinematográficas do conto de Robert Louis Stevenson. O filme deu o Óscar de melhor ator para Frederic March.

Ele trabalhou com os grandes nomes do cinema mundial nas décadas de 40 e 50 como Maurice Chevalier, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Boyer, Greta Garbo, Tyrone Power, Rita Hayworth e Fred Astaire em filmes como "Queen Christina" (Rainha Cristina); "The Mark of Zorro" (A Marca do Zorro); "Blood and Sand" (Sangue e Areia) e "Silk Stockings" (Meias de Seda), seu último filme realizado em 1957.

Image

Filmografia
1931 - City Streets
1931 - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
1932 - Love Me Tonight
1933 - Queen Christina
1933 - The Song of Songs
1934 - We Live Again
1935 - Becky Sharp
1936 - The Gay Desperado
1937 - High, Wide, and Handsome
1939 - Applause
1939 - Golden Boy
1940 - The Mark of Zorro
1941 - Blood and Sand
1942 - Rings on Her Fingers
1944 - Laura (não-creditado)
1948 - Summer Holiday
1952 - The Wild Heart
1957 - Silk Stockings

Obtido em "http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rouben_Mamoulian"

Image

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a 1931 horror film directed by Rouben Mamoulian and starring Fredric March. The film is an adaptation of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886), the Robert Louis Stevenson tale of a man who takes a potion which turns him from a mild-mannered man of science into a crude homicidal maniac.

Plot
The film tells of Dr. Jekyll (Fredric March), a kind doctor who experiments with drugs because he's certain that within each man lurks impulses for both good and evil.

Dr. Jekyll develops a drug to release the evil side in himself, becoming the hard drinking, woman-chasing Mr. Hyde. Jekyll quickly becomes addicted to the formula, and unable to control the violent and unstable Mr. Hyde.

Background
The film, made prior to the full enforcement of the Production Code, is remembered today for its strong sexual content, embodied mostly in the character of the prostitute, Ivy Pearson, played by Miriam Hopkins. When the film was re-released in 1936, the Code required 8 minutes to be removed before the film could be distributed to theaters. This footage was restored for the VHS and DVD releases.

Image

The secret of the astonishing transformation scenes was not revealed for decades (Mamoulian himself revealed it in a volume of interviews with Hollywood directors published under the title The Celluloid Muse). A series of colored filters matching the make-up was used, enabling the make-up applied in contrasting colours, to be gradually exposed or made invisible. The change in color was not visible on the black-and-white film.

Perc Westmore's make-up for Hyde, simian and hairy with large canine teeth influenced greatly the popular image of Hyde in media and comic books; in part this reflected the novella's implication of Hyde as embodying repressed evil and hence being semi-evolved or simian in appearance. The characters of Muriel Carew and Ivy Pearson do not appear in Stevenson's original story but do appear in the 1887 stage version by playwright Thomas Russell Sullivan.

Cast
Fredric March as Dr. Henry Jekyll / Mr. Edward Hyde
Miriam Hopkins as Ivy Pearson
Rose Hobart as Muriel Carew
Holmes Herbert as Dr. John Lanyon
Halliwell Hobbes as Brig. Gen. Danvers Carew
Edgar Norton as Poole, Jekyll's butler
Tempe Pigott as Mrs. Hawkins, Ivy's landlady

Image

History and Ownership
When Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer remade the film 10 years later with Spencer Tracy in the lead, the studio bought the rights to, and then recalled every print of the Mamoulian version that it could locate and most of the film was believed lost for decades. Ironically, the Tracy version was much less well received and March jokingly sent Tracy a telegram thanking him for the greatest boost to his reputation of his entire career. (Tracy and March would later appear together for the only time in 1960s Inherit The Wind)

As a result of MGM's purchase of this film, it is not owned by Universal Studios, which owns most pre-1950 Paramount sound features (and themselves have produced a popular line of horror films). Instead, MGM held on to the film for 45 years. The film passed on to Turner Entertainment after Ted Turner's short-lived acquisition of MGM, and then to Warner Bros. when Time Warner bought out Turner. Since then, Warner Home Video has released this film on DVD along with the 1941 version. Technically, Turner still owns the copyright, but WB handles sales and distribution for all Turner-owned titles.

Awards
Fredric March as Mr. Hyde.Wins

Academy Awards: Oscar; Best Actor in a Leading Role, Fredric March; tied with Wallace Beery for The Champ; 1932.
Venice Film Festival: Audience Referendum; Most Favorite Actor, Fredric March; Most Original Fantasy Story, Rouben Mamoulian; 1932.

Nominations
Academy Awards: Oscar; Best Cinematography, Karl Struss; Best Adaptation Writing, Percy Heath and Samuel Hoffenstein; 1932.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Jekyll_and_Mr._Hyde_(1931_film)"


Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was an American stage and film actor. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1932 for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and in 1946 for The Best Years of Our Lives.

Early life
March was born Ernest Frederick McIntyre Bickel in Racine, Wisconsin, the son of Cora Brown (née Marcher), a schoolteacher, and John F. Bickel, a devout Presbyterian Church elder who worked in the wholesale hardware business.[1] March attended the Winslow Elementary School (established in 1855), Racine High School, and the University of Wisconsin–Madison where he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He began a career as a banker, but an emergency appendectomy caused him to reevaluate his life, and in 1920 he began working as an extra in movies made in New York City, using a shortened form of his mother's maiden name, Marcher. He appeared on Broadway in 1926, and by the end of the decade signed a film contract with Paramount Pictures.

Career
March received an Oscar nomination in 1930 for The Royal Family of Broadway, in which he played a role based upon John Barrymore (which he had first played on stage in Los Angeles). He won the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1932 for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (tied with Wallace Beery for The Champ), leading to a series of classic films based on stage hits and classic novels like Design for Living (1933), Death Takes a Holiday (1934), Les Misérables (1935), Anthony Adverse (1936), and as the original Norman Maine A Star is Born (1937), for which he received his third Oscar nomination.



March was one of the few leading actors of his era to resist signing long-term contracts with the studios, and was able to freelance and pick and choose his roles, in the process also avoiding typecasting. He returned to Broadway after a ten year absence in 1937 with a notable flop Yr. Obedient Husband, but after the huge success of Thornton Wilder's The Skin of Our Teeth he focused his work as much on Broadway theatre as often as on Hollywood film, and his screen career was not as prolific as it had been. He won two Best Actor Tony Awards: in 1947 for the play Years Ago, written by Ruth Gordon; and in 1957 for his performance as James Tyrone in the original Broadway production of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night. He also had major successes in A Bell for Adano in 1944 and Gideon in 1961, and played Ibsen's An Enemy of the People on Broadway in 1951. He also starred in such films as I Married a Witch (1942) and Another Part of the Forest (1948) during this period, and won his second Oscar in 1946 for The Best Years of Our Lives. March also branched out into television, winning Emmy nominations for his third attempt at The Royal Family for the series The Best of Broadway as well as for a television performances as Samuel Dodsworth and Ebenezer Scrooge. On March 25, 1954, March co-hosted the 26th Annual Academy Awards ceremony from New York City, with co-host Donald O'Connor in Los Angeles.

March's neighbor in Connecticut, playwright Arthur Miller, was thought to favor March to inaugurate the part of Willy Loman in the Pulitzer Prize-winning Death of a Salesman (1949). However, March read the play and turned down the role, whereupon director Elia Kazan cast Lee J. Cobb as Willy, and Arthur Kennedy as one of Willy's sons, Biff Loman, two men that the director had worked with in the film Boomerang (1947). March later regretted turning down the role and finally played Willy Loman in Columbia Pictures's 1951 film version of the play, directed by Laslo Benedek, receiving his fifth-and-final Oscar nomination as well as a Golden Globe Award. Perhaps March's greatest later career role was in Inherit the Wind (1960), opposite Spencer Tracy.

When March underwent major surgery for prostate cancer in 1970, it seemed his career was over, yet he managed to give one last great performance in The Iceman Cometh (1973), as the complicated Irish bartender, Harry Hope.

March has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1616 Vine Street.

Personal life
Although March died in Los Angeles, California at the age of 77 from cancer, he considered the rural Litchfield County town of New Milford, Connecticut his primary residence since the 1930s. This property was subsequently home to American playwright Lillian Hellman as well as former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. March was married to actress Florence Eldridge from 1927 until his death, and they had two adopted children. He was buried at his estate in New Milford, Connecticut.

Throughout his life, he and his wife were supporters of the Democratic Party and liberal political causes. His support for the Republican (Second Spanish Republic) side during the Spanish Civil War was particularly controversial.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fredric_March"


Image
Não importa como, não importa quando, não importa onde, a culpa será sempre do T!

-- um membro qualquer do BBdE!

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 22 Mar 2010 12:09

Vi ontem o filme pela primeira vez (e já estou a rever a versão do Fleming para me lembrar melhor dela) e achei extraordinário! Para quem gosta de apreciar os pormenores técnicos e artísticos do cinema, o filme é uma nascente de água cristalina com capacidade para fazer transbordar uma barragem. Só aquela sequência inicial, com a câmara "na primeira pessoa", chegaria para fazer sobressair o filme na história do cinema. :bow:

A "disposição" câmara oscila entre a elegância formal (absoluta) e a obsessão voraz e deslavada pelas corpos das personagens (algumas vezes com uma forte conotação sexual) e pelas suas emoções, com revelo para os close-ups meio desfocados que faz às caras.

Este é mais um que tem muito para dissecar (como aconteceu com os anteriores do ciclo).

Já não me lembro muito bem do romance de Stevenson, mas creio que não havia o enredo amoroso todo que o filme mostra.
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby annawen » 22 Mar 2010 12:37

Eu já o tenho mas ainda não vi.

Samwise wrote:Já não me lembro muito bem do romance de Stevenson, mas creio que não havia o enredo amoroso todo que o filme mostra.


No livro não há qualquer enredo amoroso.

User avatar
Thanatos
Edição Única
Posts: 13870
Joined: 31 Dec 2004 22:36
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Thanatos » 22 Mar 2010 12:43

Os enredos amorosos são quase um fait accompli no cinema do studio system (e mesmo do actual) e não é a primeira nem será a última obra a ser adaptada em que é enfiado a martelo um love interest.

O engraçado é que, em última análise, podia-se fazer um leitura geral do filme sem ligar alguma a esse enredo amoroso. :P
Não importa como, não importa quando, não importa onde, a culpa será sempre do T!

-- um membro qualquer do BBdE!

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 22 Mar 2010 13:01

Thanatos wrote:Os enredos amorosos são quase um fait accompli no cinema do studio system (e mesmo do actual) e não é a primeira nem será a última obra a ser adaptada em que é enfiado a martelo um love interest.

O engraçado é que, em última análise, podia-se fazer um leitura geral do filme sem ligar alguma a esse enredo amoroso. :P


Epá... não sei não. Há uma enorme carga/pulsão obsessiva que é criada no filme só à conta do choque entre aquilo que é amor e aquilo que apenas desejo sexual.

E discordo em absoluto de que aqui essa vertente tenha sido enfiada a martelo, já que mais de metade da espinal medula do filme comporta vértebras ligadas a esta. Algumas das sequências mais importantes do filme são até impulsionadas por "incidentes" amorosos, e dou como exemplo a noite em que "salta a tampa" (literalmente :mrgreen: ) ao Jekyll e este decide tomar a poção para poder ir afogar as mágoas do amor sem ser reconhecido.



(nota aparte: que maneira tão estranha é aquela de pronunciar Jekyll... dgee-cul :P )
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -

User avatar
Thanatos
Edição Única
Posts: 13870
Joined: 31 Dec 2004 22:36
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Thanatos » 22 Mar 2010 13:07

És capaz de ter razão na tua discordância absoluta, Samwise. Depois de ver o filme logo terei uma ideia sobre a possível martelada ou não. Ou se pelo contrário é possível uma leitura sem o tal enredo amoroso.

De qualquer forma tenho ideia que no romance o «monstro» tem uma certa pulsão sexual que se destaca do amor no sentido mais puro por ser apenas animalesco. Ou então estou a fazer confusão.
Não importa como, não importa quando, não importa onde, a culpa será sempre do T!

-- um membro qualquer do BBdE!

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby annawen » 24 Mar 2010 03:00

Também vi o filme pela primeira vez e gostei muito. Faço minhas as palavras do Sam (só tenho pena da minha cópia ter tão pouca qualidade). Apesar de só ter visto o filme do Fleming uma vez, este parece-me superior em tudo.

Devo dizer que o Mamoulian experimenta vários efeitos estilísticos que em mãos menos capazes poderiam dar asneira. Um deles é a câmara subjectiva. Não sou grande fã deste género de recurso mas aqui faz sentido a utilização e esta é feita de uma forma muito controlada.

Parece-me ser evidente que aqui os impulsos mais secretos, aqueles que têm que estar escondidos, são os impulsos sexuais. Isso fica logo estabelecido quando o Jekyll fala com a Muriel no jardim e lhe diz "The unknown wears your face" (o que me fez lembrar logo o filme do Browning). E quando diz essa frase, a câmara fecha num grande plano extraordinário da cara dela. A ânsia que Jekyll tem em adiantar o casamento vem confirmar isso. E o encontro com a Ivy, e a conversa posterior com o amigo, vem reforçar isso mesmo. Ao amigo ele chega mesmo a dizer que se o casamento demorar muito à outras maneiras de ir buscar o que deseja. Ao que o amigo responde "Isso é indecente". O Dr Jekyll quer ser livre e libertar-se das convenções da sociedade, sendo que a convenção maior é a repressão perante o sexo. Todo o filme gira à volta disto e as transformações são despoletadas pela frustração / desejo sexual do Jekyll. É sintomático, por exemplo, que quando Jeckyll rompe com a Muriel, ele diga que nunca mais lhe pode tocar. Ele sabe que isso despoletaria o Mr Hyde.

A primeira transformação é extraordinária (são todas, mas todas diferentes). Quando o Mr Hyde emerge, o espectador sente uma energia nova a percorrer o ecrã. É como assistir ao nascimento de uma nova criatura. O espreguiçar, a alegria no rosto, o grito de "Free at last!", são manifestações de um grande vitalismo e contrastam com o ambiente reprimido dos cavalheiros, do baile, das cerimónias, que até aí tínhamos visto. Eu admito que me senti bastante entusiasmada pelo Mr Hyde. Naquele momento estava com ele (talvez seja o meu lado perverso, mas estava curiosa para saber o que é que ele ia fazer a seguir).

O Fredric March está muitíssimo bem. O filme é todo dele e ele está mais do que à altura. Como Mr Hyde tem uma vitalidade que escapa ao Mr Hyde do Spencer Tracy (daquilo que me lembro). E é uma personagem com mais cambiantes. Ele é diabólico, perigoso, sádico mas também tem algo de brincalhão, de gosto pela vida, de viver a vida até ao limite. Sem responsabilidades. E isso é libertador. E é essa liberdade, o desejo dessa liberdade sem consequências, que leva o Dr Jekyll a fazer a experiência. Não foi, como ele diz no início, para separar e exterminar o mal do ser humano. Isso é conversa fiada. Foi para poder fazer o que quisesse, ser completamente livre das regras da sociedade, mas ao mesmo tempo mantendo a reputação intacta. No fundo o que ele quer é sol na eira e água no nabal.

Também a interpretação do Dr Jekyll é muito mais vibrante do que a do Spencer Tracy, que sai algo amorfa, em comparação. Não sei quem foram os concorrentes para melhor actor, mas é uma performance que não desmerece o Óscar. E não é só mais alegre, a personagem é muito mais ambígua neste filme.

Outra cena espantosa é o Mr Hyde à chuva. A personagem acorda para a vida, e sente prazer na vida. Quer sorver a vida como sorve a chuva.

A realização do Mamoulian é primorosa. Este realizador vinha experimentando com a linguagem cinematográfica nos filmes anteriores, e este não é excepção. Para além do uso da câmara subjectiva:

a) temos o enquadramento dividido ao meio (muito interessante, pois permite contrastar o mundo de Hyde e o de Jekyll, e é, ao mesmo tempo, a representação visual da natureza dúplice da personagem);

b) temos os grandes planos e os grandes planos aproximados (o mais extraordinário é aquele que mostra o rosto de Hyde a aproximar-se da câmara e a dizer para a Ivy, que está fora de enquadramento mas no mesmo alinhamento da câmara: "You come with me", de forma que parece que ele se dirige pessoalmente ao espectador);

c) temos os planos de pormenor dos objectos que comentam ironicamente o que está a suceder: o busto quando o Dr Jekyll bebe pela segunda vez a poção (a sombra dá-lhe um sorriso irónico ao rosto); a estátua do anjo e da rapariga enquanto Hyde estrangula a Ivy (este é dos meus planos favoritos);

d) o uso de símbolos, nomeadamente do fogo (simboliza as paixões da alma humana e está sempre presente quando se dá as transformações, e até como elemento de fundo sob a forma das várias lareiras que aparecem. E até como elemento ominoso: exemplo, grande plano da fogueira quando o Jekyll está a tocar piano, depois do casamento ser confirmado. E por último no grande plano da fogueira com o caldeirão. Aqui parece-me que ele simboliza a condenação da alma do Jeckyll ao Inferno e, também a futilidade, a loucura, de tudo aquilo. Neste aspecto comparar com os sinos da igreja que se ouvem na versão do Fleming. O fogo é o elemento do Hyde. É que no livro o Mr Hyde não reverte para o Dr Jekyll, como acontece aqui e no filme do Fleming.

Disse atrás que a personagem do Jekyll é ambígua. Não há acção onde isso se mostre melhor do que quando ele manda entregar o dinheiro à rapariga. Achei essa atitude desprezível, pensei logo "Olha o grande gentleman a pagar à prostituta pelos 'serviços' prestados". Porque é óbvio que ele pensa que o dinheiro resolve tudo, e não está nada interessado em vê-la para não ver o resultado das acções de Hyde, na realidade, das suas acções. Pagar à distância é muito mais cómodo e não incomoda tanto a consciência.

Em relação à transformação que ocorre quando ele se senta a observar o rouxinol. É óbvio que ela ocorre porque o pássaro é um símbolo da Ivy. O Hyde está sempre a chamá-la de pomba, rouxinol, pássaro, etc. No bar ela surge a cantar "Champanhe Ivy" (uma curiosidade, esta é uma variação de uma canção muito popular na altura chamada "Champanhe Charlie", há até um filme sobre ela do Alberto Cavalcanti). O poema que o Jekyll começa a citar é "Ode to a Nightingale", de John Keats. Toda esta sequência que termina com a morte do rouxinol, a prenunciar a morte da Ivy é brilhante.

Tal como no livro, no final é já o Hyde que tem de tomar a poção para ser o Jekyll e não o contrário.

Há medida que o filme avança o Dr Jekyll parece mais cansado e o Mr Hyde mais desfigurado.

No fundo é um filme que conta a história de um homem que andou a explorar os fundos da sua alma e encontrou um monstro. Um bom companheiro para este "Médico e o Monstro", e para o livro, é o "Retrato do Dorian Gray" (filme e livro), que foca os mesmos temas.
Last edited by annawen on 24 Mar 2010 14:30, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 24 Mar 2010 11:07

Acabei ontem de ver a versão de Victor Fleming e que é, para todos os efeitos, um remake do filme de Mamoulian. Concordo que lhe seja inferior em todos os aspectos - dir-se-ia que mais apagado e passivo, já que desaparecem a impaciência/urgência do protagonista e a forma obsessiva que estas lhe vergam a disposição. Depois falarei disto com mais calma mas ainda assim, e apesar da comparação desfavorável, considero que é um filme estimável.

Annawen, parece-me que também te ocorreu que foi um acaso feliz termos visto o The Unknown antes do Jekyll. ;)

O teu texto está muito bom - toca numa série de aspectos importantes. Vai dar um debate interessante. :)
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby annawen » 24 Mar 2010 14:28

Samwise wrote:Acabei ontem de ver a versão de Victor Fleming e que é, para todos os efeitos, um remake do filme de Mamoulian. Concordo que lhe seja inferior em todos os aspectos - dir-se-ia que mais apagado e passivo, já que desaparecem a impaciência/urgência do protagonista e a forma obsessiva que estas lhe vergam a disposição. Depois falarei disto com mais calma mas ainda assim, e apesar da comparação desfavorável, considero que é um filme estimável.


Sim, é um filme bem mais convencional na realização, mas também vale a pena.

Annawen, parece-me que também te ocorreu que foi um acaso feliz termos visto o The Unknown antes do Jekyll. ;)


Então não. Lembrei-me logo. Acho que o "The Unknown" é daqueles filmes que depois de visto não dá para esquecer.

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 24 Mar 2010 17:18

annawen wrote:
Annawen, parece-me que também te ocorreu que foi um acaso feliz termos visto o The Unknown antes do Jekyll. ;)

Então não. Lembrei-me logo. Acho que o "The Unknown" é daqueles filmes que depois de visto não dá para esquecer.


É mesmo!

Lembrei-me do filme por várias razões.

Uma teve a ver com as interpretações de dois do protagonistas principais - a Miriam Hopkins e o Lon Chaney - e com os momentos em que os seus rostos têm de revelar a contrariedade entre aquilo que os seus personagens pretendem transmitir e aquilo que sentem por dentro. Interpretações que exigem grande subtileza e que implicam que essa dualidade seja percebida inequivocamente para o espectador.

Outra foi a demência obsessiva que às tantas os personagens (neste caso o Hyde e o Alonzo) exibem no ecrã - e que os realizadores tão bem souberam criar. Há uma longa sequência neste Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde em que o monstro prende a Ivy pelos ombros e a obriga a aquiescer a uma série de questões que de qualquer forma são colocadas já de forma fechada ("..., won't you, angel?", "...,isn't it, my dear?", etc), e que tem um efeito de tensão crescente com um pico final quase insuportável de loucura e insanidade. Tal como em certas sequências do The Unknown, o nível de terror psicológico alcançado gela-nos o sangue na veias.

Outra ainda foi o contexto sexual e a leitura que pode ser inferida daquilo que se vê no ecrã, mesmo que no The Unknown o assunto esteja algo escondido ou nunca seja abordado de frente. Lembro-me bem que às tantas o Alonzo explode e diz qualquer coisa do género: "Já não aguento mais! Tenho de a ter para mim!", um comportamento semelhante ao de Jekyll, algo que os vai conscientemente impulsionar a tomarem decisões precipitadas.
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 25 Mar 2010 01:34

Bom, depois do texto da annawen, passei à fase analítica: ando a ver o filme quase frame a frame, e o facto é que ele é riquíssimo quer em conteúdo, quer em técnica e arte cinematográfica. O realizador é inventivo e domina bem aquilo que está a fazer. Há inúmeros efeitos de raccord espalhados pelo filme que são espantosos, ainda para mas se for tomado em consideração o ano do filme, 1932 - mas falarei deles numa altura posterior.

Annawen, um dos usos que o Mamoulian faz da câmara subjectiva - e que sem dúvida visa colocar o espectador na pele do personagem - é a revelação da transformação. Da primeira vez que ele toma a poção, o que vemos a seguir é o que os olhos dele vêem, e junto de um espelho que está na parede. ;)

E outro uso ocorre na sequência que vou mostrar a seguir, em que a câmara toma o ponto de vista de cada um dos amantes, alternadamente.

O objectivo deste meu post é dissecar a cena do "the unknown wears your face!", mencionada pela ti mais acima (e que é mesmo uma frase genial, dado o contexto):

Parece-me ser evidente que aqui os impulsos mais secretos, aqueles que têm que estar escondidos, são os impulsos sexuais. Isso fica logo estabelecido quando o Jekyll fala com a Muriel no jardim e lhe diz "The unknown wears your face" (o que me fez lembrar logo o filme do Browning). E quando diz essa frase, a câmara fecha num grande plano extraordinário da cara dela. A ânsia que Jekyll tem em adiantar o casamento vem confirmar isso.


Esta sequência começa com Dr. Jekyll a puxar a sua futura noiva, Muriel, para o jardim para lhe revelar a ansiedade que tem em casar com ela e o quão sofregamente a ama. Começa aqui o mergulho numa perturbante viagem que nos vai levar ao mais íntimo dos desejos sexuais de Jekyll. Para além de desta particularidade, reparem só nos planos que são utilizados para filmar a cena:


Image

Image

Image
Jekyll - «...I might have postponed telling you that I love you so much, but I don't want to wait any longer. I want you to marry me now!"

Image
Jekyll - «...Oh, my darling, I shall persuade your father to letting us marry now. I can't wait any longer!"
(...)
Jekyll - «I do love you silliestly . So silliestly that it frightens me. You open the gate for me into another world."

Image
Jekyll - «...before that, I was drawn to the misteries of science, to the unknown... but now, the unknown wears your face. Looks back at me with your eyes."

Image
Muriel - «Darling, I wish this moment would last forever..."
Jekyll - «Then make it last, dear. Ohhh, I love you. Be near me always."

Image
Muriel - «Always. I Love you.»

Image
Jekyll - «Then who shall ever separate us?"

Image
Muriel - «My sweet friend."
Jekyll - «Oh, my love, my love!"

Image

Image

Image

-------------

Vista assim descontextualizada, e sem o resto do filme para desenvolver aquilo que aqui se começa a desenhar, a cena mostra um diálogo bem lamechas e sentimental (o que é verdade, em todo o caso, e não duvido que o realizador não o soubesse e não o tivesse feito propositadamente - é que aumenta o contraste e o choque para aquilo que nos vai servir mais à frente...).
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby annawen » 25 Mar 2010 12:27

Samwise wrote:Annawen, um dos usos que o Mamoulian faz da câmara subjectiva - e que sem dúvida visa colocar o espectador na pele do personagem - é a revelação da transformação. Da primeira vez que ele toma a poção, o que vemos a seguir é o que os olhos dele vêem, e junto de um espelho que está na parede. ;)

E outro uso ocorre na sequência que vou mostrar a seguir, em que a câmara toma o ponto de vista de cada um dos amantes, alternadamente.


Sim, claro. Mas o objectivo da câmara subjectiva é precisamente esse. O que acontece é que se ela for utilizada durante muito tempo, consegue precisamente o oposto. O Zizek fala disso algures num dos livros dele e eu já pude confirmar o efeito, porque já vi um filme todo feito em câmara subjectiva. Mas, como disse em cima, aqui faz sentido e foi muito bem usada, se bem que, devo confessar, apanhei um susto quando reparei que o filme abria dessa maneira.

Vista assim descontextualizada, e sem o resto do filme para desenvolver aquilo que aqui se começa a desenhar, a cena mostra um diálogo bem lamechas e sentimental (o que é verdade, em todo o caso, e não duvido que o realizador não o soubesse e não o tivesse feito propositadamente - é que aumenta o contraste e o choque para aquilo que nos vai servir mais à frente...).


Os diálogos são excessivamente sentimentais, ainda mais para a sensibilidade contemporânea (excepto a frase "The unknown wears your face" que é fabulosa), mas o grande plano da rapariga e o fechar progressivo dos grandes planos não são nada convencionais em termos de realização. Não da maneira que são apresentados aqui. Porque há qualquer coisa de perturbador (embora essa sensação seja mais pressentida) na passagem do plano em que se vêem as cabeças dos namorados ao grande plano da rapariga.

Esta tua análise Sam está muito interessante. :tu: Dá para reparar em certos pormenores que me fugiram quando vi o filme. Por exemplo, já não me lembrava que também havia grandes planos da cara do Jekyll, só me lembrava da rapariga. E adoro o corte para o nenúfares. Outro pormenor de que não me lembrava.

Além disso, a tua análise fez-me pensar se esta cena não terá como paralelo a cena do Hyde com a Ivy. A cena de que falo é aquela que termina com o Hyde a olhar directamente para a câmara e a dizer: "You come with me". Hoje vou estar todo o dia fora, mas quando tiver possibilidade analiso essa cena fotograma a fotograma.

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 25 Mar 2010 13:02

annawen wrote:
Samwise wrote:Annawen, um dos usos que o Mamoulian faz da câmara subjectiva - e que sem dúvida visa colocar o espectador na pele do personagem - é a revelação da transformação. Da primeira vez que ele toma a poção, o que vemos a seguir é o que os olhos dele vêem, e junto de um espelho que está na parede. ;)

E outro uso ocorre na sequência que vou mostrar a seguir, em que a câmara toma o ponto de vista de cada um dos amantes, alternadamente.


Sim, claro. Mas o objectivo da câmara subjectiva é precisamente esse. O que acontece é que se ela for utilizada durante muito tempo, consegue precisamente o oposto. O Zizek fala disso algures num dos livros dele e eu já pude confirmar o efeito, porque já vi um filme todo feito em câmara subjectiva. Mas, como disse em cima, aqui faz sentido e foi muito bem usada, se bem que, devo confessar, apanhei um susto quando reparei que o filme abria dessa maneira.


Eu vi um há relativamente pouco tempo, o Cloverfield, e que utiliza a mesma "técnica" do Blair Witch Project: o filme é mostrado como se fosse uma gravação amadora, embora no caso deste último a coisa fosse levada, pela mão do Marketing, ao extremo de jogarem na dúvida de essa filmagem poder ser real. Independentemente da vantagens ou desvantagem em estar um filme todo a espreitar para o ecrã dessa perspectiva, achei os dois muito fracos.

O início deste Dr. Jeckyll lembrou-me um outro filme de terror famoso e que também utiliza a câmara subjectiva de forma muito eficaz logo a abrir: o Halloween do Carpenter - e nesse caso acompanhávamos "monstro" Myers na sua primeira "acção assassina"...

Os diálogos são excessivamente sentimentais, ainda mais para a sensibilidade contemporânea (excepto a frase "The unknown wears your face" que é fabulosa), mas o grande plano da rapariga e o fechar progressivo dos grandes planos não são nada convencionais em termos de realização. Não da maneira que são apresentados aqui. Porque há qualquer coisa de perturbador (embora essa sensação seja mais pressentida) na passagem do plano em que se vêem as cabeças dos namorados ao grande plano da rapariga. Por exemplo, já não me lembrava que também havia grandes planos da cara do Jekyll, só me lembrava da rapariga. E adoro o corte para o nenúfares. Outro pormenor de que não me lembrava.


A cena é mesmo muito pouco convencional. Chamou-me logo a atenção pelas enquadramentos cada vez mais próximos das caras deles. Pelas imagens que coloquei não dá para perceber os movimentos da câmara, mas o que se passa é o seguinte: a câmara não se move, e não se aproxima através de uso de zoom. Os planos são fixos. Isto até ao momento do beijo; a partir daí, a câmara afasta-se para baixo, como que a deixar o par na sua intimidade, percorre a estátua que está na fonte, e imobiliza-se nas flores dos nenúfares - e depois volta a mover-se através do chão de pedra do jardim para se ir focar nas pernas de alguém que se aproxima, o criado que os vem chamar, e que termina com o momento de intimidade.

Além disso, a tua análise fez-me pensar se esta cena não terá como paralelo a cena do Hyde com a Ivy. A cena de que falo é aquela que termina com o Hyde a olhar directamente para a câmara e a dizer: "You come with me". Hoje vou estar todo o dia fora, mas quando tiver possibilidade analiso essa cena fotograma a fotograma.


Eu ligo-a mais a outra: a cena em que o Jekyll leva a Ivy ao colo pelas escadas acima, assiste ao strip dela, e acaba com um beijo que é interrompido pela entrada do amigo de Jekyll pela porta dentro.

Entre as duas sequências há uma série de paralelismos muito interessante. Ambas começam com uma fuga de um local "publico", e até um local onde pode haver privacidade; em ambas há um jogo de seduções e aproximações; e ambas terminam com alguém a perturbar um momento íntimo. A coisa mais interessante é o significado de cada uma e o modo como se complementam: a cena no jardim tem por fundo o amor e a união pelo casamento (mesmo que dê indícios do desejo sexual que lhe está implícito), enquanto que a cena do quarto só fala mesmo é de sexo. Os beijos são também demonstrativos destes factores. Cada um deles está claramente definido quanto ao seu propósito. No filme, isto vai separa depois as águas entre o que pertence a Jekyll e o que pertence a Hyde. (já tenho os fotogramas dessa segunda cena e tudo... ;) )

--- EDIT---- Outra coisa separa estas duas cenas no que toca ao assunto (amor vs sexo) e que as aproxima quanto ao paralelismo narrativo: na cena do jardim são os rostos dos envolvidos que são focados alternadamente, enquanto na cena do quarto da Ivy é o corpo, e mais concretamente as pernas dela, à medida que despe as meias, e a pernas dele enquanto aguarda e assiste (com os laçarotes elásticos a serem atirados para perto de si, como sedução e provocação). No momento do beijo, ela está completamente despida.
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -

User avatar
annawen
Livro Raro
Posts: 1953
Joined: 18 Jan 2006 11:34
Location: Gaia
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby annawen » 25 Mar 2010 23:51

Samwise wrote:Eu vi um há relativamente pouco tempo, o Cloverfield, e que utiliza a mesma "técnica" do Blair Witch Project: o filme é mostrado como se fosse uma gravação amadora, embora no caso deste último a coisa fosse levada, pela mão do Marketing, ao extremo de jogarem na dúvida de essa filmagem poder ser real. Independentemente da vantagens ou desvantagem em estar um filme todo a espreitar para o ecrã dessa perspectiva, achei os dois muito fracos.

O início deste Dr. Jeckyll lembrou-me um outro filme de terror famoso e que também utiliza a câmara subjectiva de forma muito eficaz logo a abrir: o Halloween do Carpenter - e nesse caso acompanhávamos "monstro" Myers na sua primeira "acção assassina"...


O filme que me referi é um policial com o Philip Marlowe. Penso que realizado pelo Dick Powell, mas não tenho a certeza. É muito irritante, porque a câmara assume o papel do Marlowe e nunca vemos a cara dele, excepto em reflexo nos espelhos. O que faz com que a identificação que o espectador estabelece com a personagem se rompa, e fiquemos com a sensação da presença da câmara. Isto é, em vez de nos "perdermos" no filme, tomamos consciência que estamos a ver um filme. Durante o filme todo eu pensava cá para mim: "quem me dera que eles voltassem a câmara ao contrário, nem que fosse por um bocadinho." Como já disse, o Zizek analisa este efeito e a respeito exactamente do filme que vi.

Quanto aos filmes que referiste, só vi o "Halloween". E lembrei-me dele como um bom exemplo. Acontece que, por azares do destino, nunca vi o "Halloween" desde o início. Quando dá na televisão, já o Michael Myers é adulto e está internado.

Isto até ao momento do beijo; a partir daí, a câmara afasta-se para baixo, como que a deixar o par na sua intimidade, percorre a estátua que está na fonte, e imobiliza-se nas flores dos nenúfares - e depois volta a mover-se através do chão de pedra do jardim para se ir focar nas pernas de alguém que se aproxima, o criado que os vem chamar, e que termina com o momento de intimidade.


E todo o filme está cheio de travellings espantosos.

Eu ligo-a mais a outra: a cena em que o Jekyll leva a Ivy ao colo pelas escadas acima, assiste ao strip dela, e acaba com um beijo que é interrompido pela entrada do amigo de Jekyll pela porta dentro.

Entre as duas sequências há uma série de paralelismos muito interessante. Ambas começam com uma fuga de um local "publico", e até um local onde pode haver privacidade; em ambas há um jogo de seduções e aproximações; e ambas terminam com alguém a perturbar um momento íntimo. A coisa mais interessante é o significado de cada uma e o modo como se complementam: a cena no jardim tem por fundo o amor e a união pelo casamento (mesmo que dê indícios do desejo sexual que lhe está implícito), enquanto que a cena do quarto só fala mesmo é de sexo. Os beijos são também demonstrativos destes factores. Cada um deles está claramente definido quanto ao seu propósito. No filme, isto vai separa depois as águas entre o que pertence a Jekyll e o que pertence a Hyde. (já tenho os fotogramas dessa segunda cena e tudo... ;) )


É possível. Ok. Pões essa, que eu ponho a outra. Parece-me que as comparações serão muito interessantes.

--- EDIT---- Outra coisa separa estas duas cenas no que toca ao assunto (amor vs sexo) e que as aproxima quanto ao paralelismo narrativo: na cena do jardim são os rostos dos envolvidos que são focados alternadamente, enquanto na cena do quarto da Ivy é o corpo, e mais concretamente as pernas dela, à medida que despe as meias, e a pernas dele enquanto aguarda e assiste (com os laçarotes elásticos a serem atirados para perto de si, como sedução e provocação). No momento do beijo, ela está completamente despida.


E o plano da perna a bailar, que ainda fica durante muito tempo em transparência, enquanto os amigos vão descendo as escadas. O plano de pormenor da perna a bailar começa por ser um plano objectivo mas, ao manter-se no ecrã, depois da câmara sair do quarto de Ivy, torna-se num plano subjectivo, por representar os pensamentos do Dr Jekyll.

Quase que se poderia dizer: o que um homem precisa de fazer para dormir com uma mulher. :devil:

E depois há as transformações. São todas diferentes.

User avatar
Samwise
Realizador
Posts: 14973
Joined: 29 Dec 2004 11:46
Location: Monument Valley
Contact:

Re: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian

Postby Samwise » 26 Mar 2010 02:45

Ainda há muita coisa para discutir neste filme. ;)

Vamos ver se mais alguém se junta durante a próxima semana. (vê lá se arranjas maneira de ver o filme, T.!!!)

A sequência com a Ivy, um "diálogo" que é feito com o corpo:

Image
Ivy - «... I ain't afraid of him, the dirty mug. He's killed me, that's what he's done! He's broken me jaw, and me knee...»

Image
Ivy - «Look where he kicked me...»
Jekyll - «It's only a bruise; it should be well in a few days.»

Image

Image
Ivy - «Anybody can see that you're a real gent, you are. You are the kind a woman would do something for.»

Image
Ivy - «You think I ought to go to bed?»
Jekyll - «I can think of no better place to rest.»
Ivy -«Oh, all right. You turn your eyes away now.»

Image

Image

Image

Image
Jekyll - «How is the pain now?...»

Image

Image
Lanyon - «I say...!!!!»

---

A propósito do "strip": sabemos que ela lhe disse para"não olhar", mas também sabemos que ele faz precisamente o contrário. Pela posição dos pés dele entende-se que ele está a ver tudo e que se trata de um "strip" cúmplice (nesta altura ela ainda não sabe que ele é médico). Durante o "evento", ela atira-lhe os elásticos das meias para perto e ele se diverte a apanhá-los com a bengala.

Deixei de fora a continuação da cena e a tal transição por encadeamento, com a perna dela que se mantém visível, sobreposta ao outro plano de imagem, durante uns instantes. A conversa que ele tem com o colega também é sugestiva q.b. para merecer uma nota....
Guido: "A felicidade consiste em conseguir dizer a verdade sem magoar ninguém." -

Nemo vir est qui mundum non reddat meliorem?

My taste is only personal, but it's all I have. - Roger Ebert

- Monturo Fotográfico - Câmara Subjectiva -


Return to “3 - Monstros”




  Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron